REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

In 2011, 69% of all Australians lived in our major cities, 85% lived within 50 kilometres of the coast and only 10% lived outside urban areas in what we would call our rural areas.

 With such a concentration in urban Australia, many of our rural areas are languishing and are not being served with adequate:

  • Infrastructure,
  • Medical services,
  • Educational services and opportunities,
  • Business opportunities,
  • Employment,
  • Support services, or
  • Access to the world wide web.


The list can be endless and I am sure we can all ‘add’ many to this basic list.

Having been involved in the development of the forerunner of the local Economic Development Units, there is a need for a linked network of Regional Economic Development Units to coordinate regional development and growth across not only the state but our nation.  The future of our rural areas demand that we do something to support our towns, our farmers and our natural resources.

 If elected to the Senate I would push to:

  • Establish Regional Economic Centres (REC) at key locations around our state and nation. These REC’s are more than business centres – they are regional hubs for education, health services, transport, infrastructure, etc..
  • Work towards no Victoria being any further away than one hundred kilometres from first class medical services.
  • Use creative forms of funding our regional development through joint funding from the Federal, State and Local governments.   Fund our regional development and buy back Australia through drawing up to 10% of monies from the Future Fund, or funding through the $1.7 trillion in Super funds held by Australians.  It is time our collective Superannuation savings are invested back in Australia.
  • Concentrate on regional economic development by working with local Economic Development Officers/Units to capitalise on the strengths within each region.  It is local knowledge that will drive regional growth.
  • Provide direct access to local members in both the State and Federal legislature to cut the red tape.
  • Depending upon the Regional Economic Centre – possible taxation benefits for investing in the region similar to a Special Economic Zone.
  • Use lease arrangements (long term) to encourage investment into these regions (both domestic and OS).  Infrastructure is built through funds invested through superannuation/national infrastructure fund and then leased back to regional/rural operators with a variable lease payment favouring the early years when setting up the business/enterprise.

Rome wasn't built in a day but it was worth it!

I will be adding my policies here as soon as I can type them up!

WATER POLICY

Abolish the Murray-Darling Basin Plan in its current form.  Restructure the Murray-Darling Basin Authority so it can fulfil the needs of the Australian people.
Put a national ‘Infrastructure Fund’ together to fund the buying back of foreign owned water rights
Construct new dams and reservoirs as well as the transfer of water to provide safe, sufficient and reliable water supplies for our cities and regional agricultural zones.  With each new dam or reservoir look at installing hydro-electric power generation capability.
Cover all irrigation channels to reduce evaporation.
The development of water grids to link up existing and new water storages of cities and regional zones as an efficient way of assuring reliable water supplies during periods of drought.  Use the grid to move water within states and regions to increase food production bring greater prosperity to the rural areas.
Reverse the North-South Pipeline.
Increased recycling and reuse of waste and grey water to conserve freshwater.

VOTE BELOW THE LINE.

Trevor William Nye, Independent SENATE candidate for Victoria.


+61467291154

EDUCATION POLICY

 

Having been involved in education at the primary, secondary and tertiary level I am a firm believer that education is the key to our national growth and wellbeing.

 The 2014 Senate Select Committee into equity and excellence in Australian schools noted ‘Educational failure also imposes high costs on society.  Poorly educated people limit economies’ capacity to produce, grow and innovate.  School failure damages social cohesion and mobility, and imposes additional costs on public budgets to deal with the consequences – higher spending on public health and social support and greater criminality, among others’.

 As an educator I believe that all funding should be targeted:

  • A base funding figure should be allocated to each student – irrespective of which school they go to.
  • Regional and rural schools should be funded to meet the unique needs of their location, e.g. cluster schools sharing specialist resources.
  • Pre-school education should be funded accordingly as it performs a key role in the education of our children.
  • Additional funding should be provided based on the needs of the child, e.g. provide support wherever it is needed.
  • Additional funding for indigenous students.
  • Teaching staff would be encouraged to make a strong commitment to imbed their professional learning into the school’s improvement and strategic plans.


I do give a Gonski.

STRONG BORDERS

 

I have been asked where I stand on immigration over the preceding days as the AEC has now had all Candidates details in the public domain since Monday – where they should be.

 Australia has a long history of accepting refugees for resettlement and over 800,000 refugees and displaced persons have settled in Australia since 1945.

 It is time for we as a country to have a ‘mature and rational immigration debate’ on the numbers of immigrants coming to Australia – a debate that looks at the following:

  • Sustainable immigration into Australia capped at around the 50,000 – 75,000,
  • Humanitarian immigration – which is around the 14,000 – 15,000.  Is this enough or do we maintain this level?
  • Off shore detention facilities,
  • Turning back the boats,
  • Our current VISA system and its use/abuse, and
  • Support structures/networks for new arrivals.


 Personally, I am for strong borders but not against immigration. 

 Between the two extremes of the anti-immigration group and the open borders group is a solution that we as a nation must come to an agreement.

 If elected to the Senate, I would be advocating very strongly for such an open mature and rational debate across the nation.

independent candidate for the senate representing victoria

FOREIGN OWNERSHIP

Government decisions must consider Australia’s long-term future, not just one election cycle.
In November, 2015, our current Deputy Prime Minister, Mr Barnaby Joyce stated, "Australia has more foreign investment land than any other nation ………  we've had an exponential growth in foreign ownership in our agricultural assets in Australia."

 Did you know that foreign owners now control about 35% of Northern Territory’s rural sector?  Yes 35%, or one in every three hectares are foreign owned and controlled in the NT alone.

 Over the entire nation it is estimated that 15% of our total agricultural land is in foreign ownership.  This percentage doesn’t sound too high does it, but wait:

  1. 53% of Australia is designated as desert,
  2. 23% is designated as Indigenous lands and the governments of Australia will not give title deed to those lands so we must take them out of our calculation, and
  3. 7% is National Parks.

So in reality we are talking about a figure around 17% of the total Australian Land mass is available to sustain our great nation.  But wait, some of this is taken up with our urban sprawl, infrastructure, industry, mining, etc..  So we don’t even have 17% to put into agricultural; then we must remember that 15% of the available land is foreign owned and is being exploited for the benefit of foreign governments and companies. 

 I draw your attention to Fonterra’s chief executive Theo Spierings said: “What we are doing is drive every cent of money which we can out of Australia back to New Zealand.”

 We must stop the sale of prime agricultural and businesses to overseas companies and Governments.

 I am standing for the Senate representing Victoria and if elected I will pursue:

  • Ten percent of the accumulated superannuation funds in Australia be invested in the Agricultural sector.  If needed these funds can be used to ‘Buy Back the Farm’.  This equates to about $170 Billion dollars to invest back into our land and revitalise our agricultural/rural sector.
  • Ten percent of our future fund be invested in the agricultural/rural sector.
  • The Foreign Investment Review Board Review will review all sales of Australian rural and agricultural land and assets over the value of $2 million dollars (applied to cumulative purchases) to foreign owners.
  • All sales of rural and agricultural land and assets to foreign owners over the value (accumulative) of $20 million become unlawful and instead be replaced by a long term lease arrangement with attached conditions of land and asset improvements.  Failure to meet these conditions will result in forfeiture of the leased land or asset.
  • All decisions of the Foreign Investment Review Board to be made public for all Australians to read within two weeks of the decision being made.
  • The Australian Tax Office undertake a ‘stocktake” of current foreign owned land, assets, businesses and water.
  • This Stocktake be made public as a national register available for all Australians to access.
  • The sale of water titles to foreign ownership be restricted.
  • A national water register be established.
  • The Senate undertake a review of the Agriculture Sector and its future.
  • Increased funding into the Agricultural and Horticultural education sector through the re-distribution of current federal funding into education to encourage our youth to stay on the land.

My policies include:

Stop Foreign Ownership
Increase employment opportunities in our regional and rural areas
Increase regional spending on education in our schools
Provide a decent pension for our older Australians
Bring better Health services to our regions
Hands off Medicare
Support our farmers


I am running for the Senate as an Independent representing Victoria and have drafted various policy statements and it has become very obvious that many candidates and parties are so generalised in what they hope to achieve, I felt that I should expand on what I stand for.

 I have spent nearly forty years involved in education, policing, regional development and business around this great State of Victoria and have lived and/or worked in Horsham, Bendigo, Gisborne, Mt Evelyn, Melbourne, Bridgewater-On-Loddon, Shepparton, Ballarat, Mornington Peninsula and now Mildura

.

What have I learnt in this time?  We must develop our regional and rural areas or we will find ourselves in situations like we are now facing:

  • Massive increase in foreign ownership of Australian farms and businesses – Buy back the farm and invest the profits back into Australia
  • Roads being closed as rural councils/shires are trying to reduce expenditure.  We need infrastructure to support our regional growth.
  • Services withdrawn (mobile libraries, patient transport services, Post Offices and schools being closed or amalgamated, -  for example).  Lose your PO/School/Police Stations and you start to lose your town.
  • Rural folk having to travel hundreds of kilometres to access health services,
  • Businesses closing due to changing economic conditions/droughts,
  • Massive sale of water to foreign ownership,
  • Retail duopolies selling products below cost and putting major pressure on producers to reduce their farm gate sale price below production costs e.g. the dairy industry,
  • Rail lines being mothballed, closed or not repaired after the 2011 flood in Central Victoria e.g. Bridgewater-On-Loddon,


I am a firm believer that this can be reversed through someone actually doing something about it; it is easy to promise -  but hard to deliver. I will work very hard to deliver.

It will take time, the will of the nation and a group of focused and committed qualified representatives at the political level to restructure our regions and put life back into our rural communities.

 Having been involved in the forerunner of the current local economic development structures, there is a need for a linked network of Regional Economic Development Units to coordinate regional development and growth across not only the state but our nation.  The future of our rural areas demand that we do something to support our towns, our businesses, our farmers and our natural resources.

 When elected to the Senate I would promote the:

  • Establishment of Regional Economic Centres (REC) at key locations around our state and nation. These REC’s are more than business centres – they are regional hubs for education (I give a Gonski), health services, transport, infrastructure, water management, business support centres, etc..
  •  These REC’s are staffed and run by local people for their local region with the assistance of both the State and Federal governments.
  • Work towards no Victorian being any further away than one hundred kilometres from first class medical services; partially through the funding of the current trials of the use of haptic devices in regional centres,
  • Use creative forms of funding our regional development through joint funding from the Federal, State and Local governments.   Fund our regional development and buy back Australia through drawing up to 10% of monies from the Future Fund, or funding through the $2 trillion in Super funds held by Australians.  It is time our collective Superannuation savings are invested back in Australia.
  • Concentrate on regional economic development by working with local Economic Development Officers/Units to capitalise on the strengths within each region.  It is local knowledge that will drive regional growth.
  • Provide direct access to local members in both the State and Federal legislature to cut the red tape.
  • Depending upon the Regional Economic Centre – provide taxation benefits for investing in the region similar to a Special Economic Zone.
  • Use lease arrangements (long term) to encourage investment into these regions as we have the capacity to do this ourselves.
  • Infrastructure is built via funds invested through superannuation/national infrastructure funds and then leased back to regional/rural operators with a variable lease payment favouring the early years when setting up the business/enterprise.
  • Development of Regional Business Incubators through both local, state and federal funding to encourage the regional generation of jobs.
  • The undertaking of a review and analysis of each region to tailor funding/development to the actual needs of the region – no more blanket solutions to regional problems delivered from the capital.
  • Look at funding regional development over a ten-year cycle – not just between elections when someone in Canberra makes a promise.


The development of our regions will take time – this is not a one election cycle answer to our problems, but we have to start somewhere.

 Where do you start – Vote below the line for true representation in the Senate.